Certified information systems security professional (c.i.s.s.p.)

Certified information systems security professional (c.i.s.s.p.)
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Accelerate your cybersecurity career with the CISSP certification.

Earning the CISSP proves you have what it takes to effectively design, implement and manage a best-in-class cybersecurity program. With a CISSP, you validate your expertise and become an (ISC)² member, unlocking a broad array of exclusive resources, educational tools, and peer-to-peer networking opportunities.

Prove your skills, advance your career, and gain the support of a community of cybersecurity leaders here to support you throughout your career


Course Introduction

The CISSP Exam

Cryptography

Physical (Environmental) Security

Security Architecture and Design

Access Control

Software Development Security

Information Security Governance and Risk Management

Telecommunications and Network Security

Operation Security

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The CISSP: Certified Information Systems Security Professional Certification certification training package covers topics such as Access Control Systems, Cryptography, and Security Management Practices, teaching students the eight domains of information system security knowledge.  

The new eight domains are:

  1. Security and Risk Management
  2. Asset Security
  3. Security Engineering
  4. Communications and Network Security
  5. Identity and Access Management
  6. Security Assessment and Testing
  7. Security Operations
  8. Software Development Security

The CISSP Certification is administered by the International Information Systems Security Certification Consortium or (ISC)². (ISC)² promotes the CISSP exam as an aid to evaluating personnel performing information security functions.  Candidates for this exam are typically network security professionals and system administrators with at least four years of direct work experience in two or more of the ten test domains.  As the first ANSI ISO accredited credential in the field of information security, the Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) certification provides information security professionals with not only an objective measure of competence, but a globally recognized standard of achievement.

Who Earns The CISSP?

The CISSP is ideal for experienced security practitioners, managers and executives interested in proving their knowledge across a wide array of security practices and principles, including those in the following positions:

  • Chief Information Security Officer
  • Chief Information Officer
  • Director of Security
  • IT Director/Manager
  • Security Systems Engineer
  • Security Analyst
  • Security Manager
  • Security Auditor
  • Security Architect
  • Security Consultant
  • Network Architect
 

 

 

 

 

…But It’s Not For Everyone

The CISSP isn’t the best option for every cybersecurity professional. Before you start down your certification path, make sure you aren’t missing an opportunity to pursue a certification more aligned with your immediate career goals

Who this course is for:
  • Experienced IT security-related practitioners, auditors, consultants, investigators or instructors, including network or security analysts and engineers, network administrators, information security specialists and risk management professionals, who wish to advance their current computer security careers

Skills Measured by CISSP Certification

The CISSP certification exam measures your skills and expertise in ten (10) key information security domains:

  • Access Control – A collection of mechanisms that work together to create security architecture to protect the assets of the information system.
  • Telecommunications and Network Security – Discusses network structures, transmission methods, transport formats and security measures used to provide availability, integrity and confidentiality.
  • Information Security Governance and Risk Management – The identification of an organization’s information assets and the development, documentation and implementation of policies, standards, procedures and guidelines.
  • Application Development Security – Refers to the controls that are included within systems and applications software and the steps used in their development.
  • Cryptography – The principles, means and methods of disguising information to ensure its integrity, confidentiality and authenticity.
  • Security Architecture and Design – Contains the concepts, principles, structures and standards used to design, implement, monitor, and secure, operating systems, equipment, networks, applications, and those controls used to enforce various levels of confidentiality, integrity and availability.
  • Operations Security – Used to identify the controls over hardware, media and the operators with access privileges to any of these resources.
  • Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Planning – Addresses the preservation of the business in the face of major disruptions to normal business operations.
  • Legal, Regulations, Investigations and Compliance – Addresses computer crime laws and regulations; the investigative measures and techniques which can be used to determine if a crime has been committed and methods to gather evidence.
  • Physical (Environmental) Security – Addresses the threats, vulnerabilities and countermeasures that can be utilized to physically protect an enterprise’s resources and sensitive information.